The lost Book of Nostradamus



The lost Book of Nostradamus

By Amber William

Michel de Nostredame (14 December or 21 December 1503 2 July 1566). Usually Latinised to Nostradamus, was a French apothecary and reputed seer who published collections of prophecies that have since become famous worldwide. He is best known for his book Les Propheties ("The Prophecies"), the first edition of which appeared in 1555. Since the publication of this book, which has rarely been out of print since his death, Nostradamus has attracted a following that, along with the popular press, credits him with predicting many major world events. The prophecies have in some cases been assimilated to the results of applying the alleged Bible code, as well as to other purported prophetic works. Most academic sources maintain that the associations made between world events and Nostradamus's quatrains are largely the result of misinterpretations or mistranslations (sometimes deliberate) or else are so tenuous as to render them useless as evidence of any genuine predictive power. Moreover, none of the sources listed offers any evidence that anyone has ever interpreted any of Nostradamus's quatrains specifically enough to allow a clear identification of any event in advance.

Born on 14 or 21 December 1503 in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence in the south of France, where his claimed birthplace still exists, Michel de Nostredame was one of at least nine children of Reynière de St-Rémy and grain dealer and notary Jaume de Nostredame. The latter's family had originally been Jewish, but Jaume's father, Guy Gassonet, had converted to Catholicism around 1455, taking the Christian name "Pierre" and the surname "Nostredame" (the latter apparently from the saint's day on which his conversion was solemnized). Michel's known siblings included Delphine, Jehan (c. 150777), Pierre, Hector, Louis, Bertrand, Jean II (born 1522) and Antoine (born 1523).Little else is known about his childhood, although there is a persistent tradition that he was educated by his maternal great-grandfather Jean de St. Rémy — a tradition which is somewhat vitiated by the fact that the latter disappears from the historical record after 1504, when the child was only one year old…


At the age of fifteen the young Nostredame entered the University of Avignon to study for his baccalaureate. After little more than a year (when he would have studied the regular trivium of grammar, rhetoric and logic, rather than the later quadrivium of geometry, arithmetic, music and astronomy/astrology), he was forced to leave Avignon when the university closed its doors in the face of an outbreak of the plague. After leaving Avignon, Nostredame (according to his own account) traveled the countryside for eight years from 1521 researching herbal remedies. In 1529, after some years as an apothecary, he entered the University of Montpellier to study for a doctorate in medicine. He was expelled shortly afterward when it was discovered that he had been an apothecary, a "manual trade" expressly banned by the university statutes.[7] The expulsion document (BIU Montpellier, Register S 2 folio 87) still exists in the faculty library.[2] However, some of his publishers and correspondents would later call him "Doctor". After his expulsion, Nostredame continued working, presumably still as an apothecary, and became famous for creating a "rose pill" that supposedly protected against the plague.


In 1531 Nostredame was invited by Jules-César Scaliger, a leading Renaissance scholar, to come to Agen.There he married a woman of uncertain name (possibly Henriette d'Encausse), who bore him two children.[9] In 1534 his wife and children died, presumably from the Plague. After their deaths, he continued to travel, passing through France and possibly Italy.
Nostradamus's house at Salon-de-Provence, as reconstructed after the 1909 earthquake.

According to 4 major biblical prophets something truly terrifying is coming our way, and it will hit homeland before the 1st of January 2017…

On his return in 1545, he assisted the prominent physician Louis Serre in his fight against a major plague outbreak in Marseille, and then tackled further outbreaks of disease on his own in Salon-de-Provence and in the regional capital, Aix-en-Provence. Finally, in 1547, he settled in Salon-de-Provence in the house which exists today, where he married a rich widow named Anne Ponsarde, with whom he had six children — three daughters and three sons.Between 1556 and 1567 he and his wife acquired a one-thirteenth share in a huge canal project organized by Adam de Craponne to irrigate largely waterless Salon-de-Provence and the nearby Désert de la Crau from the river Durance.


After another visit to Italy, Nostredame began to move away from medicine and toward the occult. Following popular trends, he wrote an almanac for 1550, for the first time Latinizing his name from Nostredame to Nostradamus. He was so encouraged by the almanac's success that he decided to write one or more annually. Taken together, they are known to have contained at least 6,338 prophecies,[10][2] as well as at least eleven annual calendars, all of them starting on 1 January and not, as is sometimes supposed, in March. It was mainly in response to the almanacs that the nobility and other prominent persons from far away soon started asking for horoscopes and "psychic" advice from him, though he generally expected his clients to supply the birth charts on which these would be based, rather than calculating them himself as a professional astrologer would have done. When obliged to attempt this himself on the basis of the published tables of the day, he always made numerous errors, and never adjusted the figures for his clients' place or time of birth.(Refer to the analysis of these charts by Brind'Amour, 1993, and compare Gruber's comprehensive critique of Nostradamus horoscope for Crown Prince Rudolph Maximilian.)


By 1566, Nostradamus's gout, which had plagued him painfully for many years and made movement very difficult, turned into oedema, or dropsy. In late June he summoned his lawyer to draw up an extensive will bequeathing his property plus 3,444 crowns (around $300,000 US today) — minus a few debts — to his wife pending her remarriage, in trust for her sons pending their twenty-fifth birthdays and her daughters pending their marriages. This was followed by a much shorter codicil.[3] On the evening of 1 July, he is alleged to have told his secretary Jean de Chavigny, “You will not find me alive at sunrise.” The next morning he was reportedly found dead, lying on the floor next to his bed and a bench (Presage 141 [originally 152] for November 1567, as posthumously edited by Chavigny to fit). He was buried in the local Franciscan chapel (part of it now incorporated into the restaurant La Brocherie) but re-interred in the Collégiale St-Laurent during the French Revolution, where his tomb remains to this day.


Nostradamus was not only a diviner, but a professional healer, too. It is known that he wrote at least two books on medical science. One was an extremely free translation (i.e. a "paraphrase") of The Protreptic of Galen (Paraphrase de C. GALIEN, sus l'Exhortation de Menodote aux estudes des bonnes Artz, mesmement Medicine) , and in his so-called Traité des fardemens (basically a medical cookbook containing, once again, materials borrowed mainly from others) he included a description of the methods he used to treat the plague — none of which, not even the bloodletting, apparently worked. The same book also describes the preparation of cosmetics.

A manuscript normally known as the Orus Apollo also exists in the Lyon municipal library, where upwards of 2,000 original documents relating to Nostradamus are stored under the aegis of Michel Chomarat. It is a purported translation of an ancient Greek work on Egyptian hieroglyphs based on later Latin versions, all of them unfortunately ignorant of the true meanings of the ancient Egyptian script, which was not correctly deciphered until the advent of Champollion in the 19th century.
Since his death only the Prophecies have continued to be popular, but in this case they have been quite extraordinarily so. Over two hundred editions of them have appeared in that time, together with over 2000 commentaries. Their popularity seems to be partly due to the fact that their vagueness and lack of dating make it easy to quote them selectively after every major dramatic event and retrospectively claim them as "hits" (see Nostradamus in popular culture).


When a momentous catastrophe occurs, people react in a variety of ways. One response is to seek out prophecies of the event — inspired predictions that foretold its coming. These forecasts can be comforting because they suggest that the horrible incidents were inevitable, that they happened as part of a larger plan. Through the course of human history, there have been hundreds of notable prophets, but in the wake of modern tragedies, one name seems to pop up more than any other: Nostradamus. 

Nostradamus has been credited with predicting, among other things, the reign of Napoleon, the atom bomb, the moon landing and the assassination of John F. Kennedy.
Nostradamus has been credited with prophesying dozens of pivotal episodes in recent history, including the rise of Adolf Hitler, the assassination of John F. Kennedy and, most recently, the destruction of the World Trade Center towers. On the Internet, Nostradamus followers and hoaxers alike have put together detailed interpretations of Nostradamus' works, as well as fabricated passages.
In this article, we'll find out who Nostradamus was and what he did. We'll also look at the ongoing controversy surrounding Nostradamus, including his supposed prediction of the September 11 attack on the United States


The prophet forged visions into cryptic verse after sitting alone in a state of trance in nightly vigils locked away in his secret upstairs study in Salon Provence summoning what he called "angelic emissaries from God" to his aid. In the mid-1550s, he received from them words, sounds and twilit images warning about a third and final antichrist that has yet to fully reveal himself. This man is described in a prophecy indexed 10 Q72 (Century 10, Quatrain 72) as, The king of terror. He will enter the world stage, descending from distant future skies, In the year 1999 September month.
Nostradamus fashioned anagrams out of numbers too. If the month of "September" is a lead, then "1999" could be a reverse code for the actual year, month and DAY:

1999 = 9111

Thus the prophecy means to say:

In the year 9.11.1 September month,
The great King of Terror comes from the Sky.

Nostradamus gave the Third Antichrist the following code name. He's Mabus. A number of notorious contemporary figures, still living or recently dead from the Middle East can see their names spelled in the Mabus code. But there also are other leaders from the West, deeply entangled in Middle Eastern turmoil, a current US president and a charismatic candidate who could be his successor whose names also easily decode out of Mabus, making the search for the right candidate the most provocative and topical challenge presented by Nostradamus for our present times.
Though his true name is occulted, the Third Antichrist's destiny is made clear. Unlike the first two, he is the first to die in a war he initiates at the sign of a comet, or a rocket falling out of the skies:
His act of terror unites a hundred nations in a war against what Nostradamus calls three Eastern kings secretly allied in opposition to the West. They would use piracy (hijacking?), ambush and subterfuge to wage war.
Know the war has begun when hollow mountains of a great New City (yet to be built in Nostradamus' day) at latitude 45 in an unborn country he called Americh or Amorica, will be attacked by a fire in the sky. The hollow mountains crafted by man will be seized and plunged into the boiling cauldron of their own debris clouds.


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 By. MyDailyInformer

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