The Truth About Cancer: A Global Quest – Bacteria That Can Lead to Cancer & Viruses That Can Lead to Cancer

Cancer that has infected the world for decades.

The very word strikes fear into people’s hearts because the belief is that if you get cancer, it means a death sentence… or suffering through terrifying and sickening therapies to try to beat it.

And if you or a loved one do get cancer, the fear is magnified a thousand-fold, because the underlying “death sentence or something close to it” beliefs still hold true, only now it just got a lot more personal.

However, whether you’re trying to avoid cancer, or beat it, I’m about to replace the word “fear” with a word you really need to know and experience…

Can infections cause cancer?


Since the start of the 20th century, it’s been known that certain infections play a role in cancer in animals. More recently, infections with certain viruses, bacteria, and parasites have been recognized as risk factors for several types of cancer in humans.

Worldwide, infections are linked to about 15% to 20% of cancers. This percentage is even higher in developing countries, but it is lower in the United States and other developed countries. This is partly because certain infections are more common in developing countries, and partly because some other risk factors for cancer, such as obesity, are more common in developed countries.

Infections can raise a person’s risk of cancer in different ways. For example:

Some viruses directly affect the genes inside cells that control their growth. These viruses can insert their own genes into the cell, causing the cell to grow out of control.
Some infections can cause long-term inflammation in a part of the body. This can lead to changes in the affected cells and in nearby immune cells, which can eventually lead to cancer.
Some types of infections can suppress a person’s immune system, which normally helps protect the body from some cancers.
Any of these changes might lead to a higher risk of cancer.

Even though the infections described here can raise a person’s risk of certain types of cancer, most people with these infections never develop cancer. The risk of developing cancer is also influenced by other factors. For example, infection with Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) bacteria might increase your risk of stomach cancer, but what you eat, whether or not you smoke, and other factors also affect your risk.

Many of the infections that influence cancer risk can be passed from person to person, but cancer itself cannot. A healthy person can’t “catch” cancer from someone who has it.

In this episode titled “The True History of Chemotherapy and the Pharmaceutical Monopoly”, we will uncover the lies of chemotherapy and learn how Big Pharma falsifies “research”-based medicine. We’ll hear about the families that donated to our medical education system… and how they created a medical monopoly.

Viruses that can lead to cancer


Viruses are very small organisms; most can’t even be seen with an ordinary microscope. They are made up of a small number of genes in the form of DNA or RNA surrounded by a protein coating. A virus must enter a living cell and “hijack” the cell’s machinery in order to reproduce and make more viruses. Some viruses do this by inserting their own DNA (or RNA) into that of the host cell. When the DNA or RNA affects the host cell’s genes, it can push the cell toward becoming cancer.

In general, each type of virus tends to infect only a certain type of cell in the body. (For example, the viruses that cause the common cold only infect the cells lining the nose and throat.)

Several viruses are linked with cancer in humans. Our growing knowledge of the role of viruses as a cause of cancer has led to the development of vaccines to help prevent certain human cancers. But these vaccines can only protect against infections if they are given before the person is exposed to the cancer-promoting virus.

Human papilloma viruses (HPVs)


Human papilloma viruses (HPVs) are a group of more than 150 related viruses. They are called papilloma viruses because some of them cause papillomas, which are more commonly known as warts. Some types of HPV only grow in skin, while others grow in mucous membranes such as the mouth, throat, or vagina.

All types of HPV are spread by contact (touch). More than 40 types of HPV can be passed on through sexual contact. Most sexually active people are infected with one or more of these HPV types at some point in their lives. At least a dozen of these types are known to cause cancer.

If you are looking for a healthier way to treat some of your health problems, while enjoying a beautiful garden, medicinal plants you can grow in your garden are an excellent alternative to taking modern medicines. Just dry your herbs and create your own natural pharmacy.
Many of the prescription drugs available today have a long list of possible bad side effects, some of which may even be worse than the medical problem you’re trying to treat. This is why many people are searching for a more natural, safer way to treat their medical problems.

HPV and other cancers


HPVs also have a role in causing some cancers of the penis, anus, vagina, and vulva. They are linked to some cancers of the mouth and throat, too. Again, although HPVs have been linked to these cancers, most people infected with HPV never develop these cancers.

Smoking, which is also linked with these cancers, may work with HPV to increase cancer risk. Other genital infections may also increase the risk that HPV will cause cancer.

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)


EBV is a type of herpes virus. It is probably best known for causing infectious mononucleosis, often called “mono” or the “kissing disease.” In addition to kissing, EBV can be passed from person to person by coughing, sneezing, or by sharing drinking or eating utensils. Most people in the United States are infected with EBV by the end of their teen years, although not everyone develops the symptoms of mono.

As with other herpes virus infections, EBV infection is life-long, even though most people have no symptoms after the first few weeks. EBV infects and stays in certain white blood cells in the body called B lymphocytes (also called B cells). There are no medicines or other treatments to get rid of EBV, nor are there vaccines to help prevent it.

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV)

Both HBV and HCV cause viral hepatitis, a type of liver infection. Other viruses can also cause hepatitis (hepatitis A virus, for example), but only HBV and HCV can cause the long-term (chronic) infections that increase a person’s chance of liver cancer. In the United States, less than half of liver cancers are linked to HBV or HCV infection. But this number is much higher in some other countries, where both viral hepatitis and liver cancer are much more common. Some research also suggests that long-term HCV infection might be linked with some other cancers, such as non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

HBV and HCV are spread from person to person in much the same way as HIV (see the section on HIV below) — through sharing needles (such as during injection drug use), unprotected sex, or childbirth. They can also be passed on through blood transfusions, but this is rare in the United States because donated blood is tested for these viruses.

Of the 2 viruses, infection with HBV is more likely to cause symptoms, such as a flu-like illness and jaundice (yellowing of the eyes and skin). Most adults recover completely from HBV infection within a few months. Only a very small portion of adults go on to have chronic HBV infections, but this risk is higher in young children. People with chronic HBV infections have a higher risk for liver cancer.

Human T-lymphotrophic virus-1 (HTLV-1)

HTLV-1 has been linked with a type of lymphocytic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma called adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). This cancer is found mostly in southern Japan, the Caribbean, central Africa, parts of South America, and in some immigrant groups in the southeastern United States.

In addition to ATL, this virus can cause other health problems, although many people with HTLV-1 don’t have any of them.

HTLV-1 belongs to a class of viruses called retroviruses. These viruses use RNA (instead of DNA) for their genetic code. To reproduce, they must go through an extra step to change their RNA genes into DNA. Some of the new DNA genes can then become part of the chromosomes of the human cell infected by the virus. This can change how the cell grows and divides, which can sometimes lead to cancer.

Viruses with uncertain or unproven links to cancer in humans
Simian virus 40 (SV40)

SV40 is a virus that usually infects monkeys. Some polio vaccines prepared between 1955 and 1963 were made from monkey cells and were later found to be contaminated with SV40.

Some older studies suggested that infection with SV40 might increase a person’s risk of developing mesothelioma (a rare cancer of the lining of the lungs or abdomen), as well as some brain tumors, bone cancers, and lymphomas. But the accuracy of these older studies has been questioned.

Scientists have found that some lab animals, such as hamsters, developed mesotheliomas when they were intentionally infected with SV40. Researchers have also noticed that SV40 can make mouse cells grown in the lab become cancerous.

Other researchers have studied biopsy specimens of certain human cancers and found fragments of DNA that look like they might be from SV40. But not all researchers have found this, and fragments much like these can also be found in human tissues that show no signs of cancer.

Bacteria that can lead to cancer

Bacteria are very small living things that are made up of only one cell. Most types of bacteria aren’t harmful, but some can infect people and cause diseases. A few have even been linked with cancer.

Helicobacter pylori

Stomach cancer is not common in the United States, but it’s one of the more common types of cancer worldwide. Long-term infection of the stomach with Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) can cause ulcers. It can also inflame and damage the inner layer of the stomach. Some of these changes could lead to cancer over time, especially cancer in the lower part of the stomach. H pylori infection is also linked with some types of lymphoma of the stomach.

While H pylori infection is a major cause of stomach cancer, most people who have these bacteria in their stomachs never develop stomach cancer. There is also some evidence that people with H pylori might have a lower risk of some other types of cancer, although it is unclear exactly what role the bacteria plays in this.

About 2 in 3 adults worldwide are infected with H pylori. The rate of infection is higher developing countries and in older age groups. It’s likely spread in a couple of ways. One is the fecal-oral route, such as through contaminated food or water sources. It can also be transmitted from one person to another, mouth to mouth.

Other factors also play a role in whether or not someone develops stomach cancer. For example, nitrites are substances commonly found in cured meats, some drinking water, and certain vegetables. They can be converted by certain bacteria, such as H pylori, into compounds that have been found to cause stomach cancer in lab animals.

Antibiotics and other medicines can be used to treat H pylori infections. According to the CDC, people who have active ulcers or a history of ulcers should be tested for H pylori, and, if they are infected, should be treated. Testing for and treating H pylori infection is also recommended after removal of an early stomach cancer.

Chlamydia trachomatis

Chlamydia trachomatis is a very common kind of bacteria that can infect the female reproductive system as well as other parts of the body in both men and women. It is spread through sex.

Although infection of the reproductive organs may cause symptoms in some people, most women have no symptoms. This means that women with chlamydia usually don’t know they’re infected unless samples are taken during a pelvic exam and tested for chlamydia. It’s a common infection in younger women who are sexually active, and can remain for years unless it’s detected and treated.

Some studies have found that women whose blood tests showed past or current chlamydia infection may be at greater risk for cervical cancer than women with negative blood test results.

Studies have not shown that chlamydia itself causes cancer, but it might work with HPV in a way that promotes cancer growth. For example, researchers have found that women who had chlamydia along with HPV are more likely to still have HPV when they are re-tested later than women who have not had chlamydia. Although more studies are needed to confirm these findings, there are already good reasons to be checked for chlamydia infection and have it treated with antibiotics if it is found.

In women, long-term chlamydia infection is known to cause pelvic inflammation that can lead to infertility, mainly by building up scar tissue in the Fallopian tubes. Like other infections that inflame or cause ulcers in the genital area, chlamydia can also increase the risk of becoming infected with HIV during exposure to an HIV-infected sexual partner.

Parasites that can lead to cancer

Certain parasitic worms that can live inside the human body can also raise the risk of developing some kinds of cancer. These organisms are not found in the United States, but they can be a concern for people who live in or travel to other parts of the world.

Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis are liver flukes (a type of flatworm) that have been linked to increased risk of developing cancer of the bile ducts. The bile ducts are tubes that connect the liver to the intestines. These infections come from eating raw or undercooked freshwater fish. They occur mostly in East Asia and are rare in other parts of the world.

Schistosoma haematobium is a parasite found in the water of some countries in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia. Infection with this parasite (an illness called schistosomiasis) has been linked to bladder cancer. Possible links to other types of cancer are now being studied as well.

What is The Lost Book of Remedies? The Lost Book of Remedies PDF contains a series of medicinal and herbal recipes to make home made remedies from medicinal plants and herbs. Chromic diseases and maladies can be overcome  by taking the remedies outlined in this book. The writer claims that his grandfather was taught herbalism and healing whilst in active service during world war two and that he has treated many soldiers with his home made cures.

How does it work?

The premise is that many modern day medicines work on the basis that they treat the symptoms and not the cause, but contained within The Lost Book of Remedies are a number of tinctures and tonics made from plants and leaves that will treat the cause of the illness, thus eradicating the disease altogether.

The book is a direct copy of the little notebook carried around by the author’s grandfather when treating his patients.  However, the illustrations of the plants have been updated to photographs so that they are easier for you to identify.

READ MORE : THERE IS CURE FOR CANCER SINCE 1923 – Every Cancer Can be Cured in Weeks (Cure Cancer Naturally)

HOW TO CURE CANCER (AND HOW NOT TO DO IT): IT’S MORE COMPLEX THAN JUST KILLING CANCER CELLS & 10 Natural Cancer Treatments Revealed

HOW TO CURE CANCER & DISEASES? By Alkalinize Your Body ( NO DISEASE CAN EXIST IN AN ALKALINE ENVIRONMENT)

 READING ARTICLES IS NOT ENOUGH. YOU ABSOLUTELY NEED THIS BOOK TO UNDERSTAND WHAT IS HAPPENING IS YOU ARE TO SURVIVE WHAT IS COMING.

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