US Attack on North Korea is Imminent – War With North Korea Would be Tragic

A US attack on North Korea would be catastrophic — but the US might still do it.

Dr. Friedman is absolutely correct in his assessment of the North Korean situation. There is a peaceful way to end this menagerie before things really get out of control: Kim could be allowed to go into exile. He could be allowed to seek refuge in a country willing to accept him, without retribution from anyone – including the North Korean people , whom he has led down this path of destruction. A blanket of security could be placed over North Korea ensuring their safety and security, also billions of dollars worth of emergency aide could be immediately dispatched to that impoverished nation. Food, water, medical supplies, clean sanitation, shelters… all could be sent within hours of Kim's exile. A temporary government could be established until open and free elections are allowed to take place, and a new constitution written whereby the North Koreans could choose their own leaders and determine their own fate.. 

 

The United States and North Korea are on the brink of war following the North's latest missile test. U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis says that war with North Korea would be '"worst kind of fighting in most people's lifetimes." George Friedman bluntly declared: “If we're not going to war, we are doing a very good imitation of it.”

How to build your survival kit like a Special Forces soldier so your family will have the basics even if you have to run...

Via : aljazeera.com


 

North Korea is accelerating efforts to develop an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of delivering a nuclear warhead to the continental United States.    

Kim Jong-un reacts with scientists and engineers after Sunday's successful missile launch [KCNA via Reuters]

Though Mattis said Pyongyang isn't listening to cautions from the international community, he credited China's efforts to apply pressure as having some limited influence.  

"There appears to be some impact by the Chinese working here," he said.    

Mattis said the rocket tested on Sunday had gone extremely high and North Korean scientists were likely to have learned a lot from the test. But he would not say if it was clear the missile made a controlled re-entry from outside the atmosphere.   

In North Korea on Friday, thousands of residents lined the streets to give the scientists and workers behind Sunday's missile test a hero's welcome, state media reported.    

Even without its missiles, North Korea has amassed artillery units along its border with South Korea and any military action from Pyongyang could be devastating.    

The capital, Seoul, is only about 55km away and the North could rain shells on to the city of 10 million.

North Korea's deputy UN envoy said on Friday the United States needed to roll back its "hostile policy" towards the country before there could be talks between the pair.

"As everybody knows, the Americans have gestured [toward] dialogue," North Korea's Deputy UN Ambassador Kim In-ryong told reporters. "But what is important is not words, but actions."

"The rolling back of the hostile policy towards DPRK is the prerequisite for solving all the problems in the Korean peninsula," he said. "Therefore, the urgent issue to be settled on the Korean peninsula is to put a definite end to the US hostile policy towards DPRK, the root cause of all problems."

North Korea is also known as the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK).

US President Donald Trump warned in an interview with Reuters news agency in late April a "major, major conflict" with the North was possible, but he said he would prefer a diplomatic outcome to the dispute over its nuclear and missile programmes.

Trump later said he would be "honoured" to meet the North's leader, Kim Jong-un, under the right conditions.


 

North Korea threatens to sink approaching US carrier

Rhetoric rises as Pyongyang also warns Australia of a nuclear attack if it joins any US strike on the communist nation.

North Korea's growing nuclear and missile threat is perhaps the most serious security challenge confronting Trump. He has vowed to prevent the North from being able to hit the US with a nuclear missile and has said "all options are on the table" – including a military strike.

Via : businessinsider.com


 

North Korea, meanwhile, remained defiant.
"Our revolutionary forces are combat-ready to sink a US nuclear-powered aircraft carrier with a single strike," Rodong Sinmun, the newspaper of the North's ruling Workers' Party, said in a commentary on Sunday.

The paper likened the aircraft carrier to a "gross animal" and said a strike on it would be "an actual example to show our military's force".

As North Korea draws ever closer to possessing a nuclear weapon that could hit the US mainland, President Donald Trump and his top military advisers must weigh whether or not they'd launch a preemptive strike on North Korea and risk potentially millions of lives in the process.

But even though a US military strike on North Korea would be "tragic on an unbelievable scale," according to Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, that doesn't mean it's off the table. 

At a National Committee on US-China Relations event in New York City, Samuel J. Locklear, the former head of the US military's Pacific Command made it clear: "Just because it's tragic doesn't mean he won't do it."

"If the national interests are high enough, and I think this is the mistake that [North Korean leader] Kim Jong Un needs really to think about, if you start pressing on an issue that has to do with the survival of the United States against a nuclear attack, the tragic becomes conceivable to stop it," said Locklear. "It could be tragic."

Adm. Timothy J. Keating, another former commander of Pacific Command, echoed Locklear's statement.

"There are a wide range of options" that are "readily available to the president and the secretary of defense resident in the planning warrens at Pacific command," Keating said at the event.

The discussion between two former top military commanders shows what a difficult situation the US is in with regard to North Korea. Pyongyang may wield up to 15 or so nuclear weapons, and they repeatedly threaten to use them against US forces, South Koreans, and Japanese.

Though the US has in place the world's most advanced missile defenses, there are no guarantees when it comes to stopping ballistic missiles. Even a single nuclear warhead touching down near Seoul could kill millions of innocent South Koreans in an instant.

Additionally, South Korea's new, progressive government would likely not approve of a military strike.

But the US has its own citizens to worry about. Experts contacted by Business Insider have spoken with near unanimity saying North Korea wants a thermonuclear-tipped intercontinental ballistic missile to hold the US at risk. 

What exactly the US military planners discuss behind closed doors rightly remains classified, but if they calculate that a relatively small tragedy today could avert a massive tragedy tomorrow, then the US may see war with North Korea at some point.


 

People are born with the innate desire to survive, but sadly, many in our increasingly dependent society look to others for relief and assistance following a disaster. The fact is that help from government, family, or neighbors is often unavailable when needed most, and in the end you may have only yourself to count on. Do you know what to do and how to do it if disaster strikes?  If you have ever wanted to produce your own cheaper than dirt survival food…this is going to be the most important message you will ever read.

 

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